Dealing With Cryptosporidiosis On Holiday Using Social And Online

Cryptosporidium food poisoning doesn’t exactly trip off the tongue so it’s not an easy condition to describe at the holiday pharmacy, especially if English isn’t the pharmacist’s first language. What you need, then, is a way to diagnose yourself and then show your search results on screen at the pharmacy.

While the condition can’t be cured, you can reduce the symptoms – diarrhoea, stomach cramps, fatigue, fever, nausea and loss of appetite – with anti-parasitic drugs or medication to ease the diarrhoea. As the illness can last for up to ten days, it’s important to get help promptly so there’s a chance that you can enjoy some of your holiday.

The illness is caused by microscopic parasites and is generally caught by drinking contaminated water or from swimming pools. And don’t think that it’s only common to developing countries: cryptosporidiosis is found right across the world, including countries like the USA and the UK. It does however, seem to garner most attention from outbreaks at holiday resorts and the subsequent claims that the holidaymakers submit.

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Photo source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/biologycourses/7686868414/

What to do

To get comprehensive information on cryptosporidiosis in a simple format, MedicineNet’s website covers all the bases and splits the content in a question and answer format. If you load it up on your smart phone, you can then show the relevant section to a pharmacist and find out what they recommend.

Because cryptosporidiosis can be spread, you should also bookmark the section on how to avoid passing it on to others in your family or group. In general, you need to be very careful about what you touch and handle (for example, food, toilets and soiled fabrics) and continue this for a period after the illness has passed.

Finding out more

You can get Twitter feeds from the Health Protection Agency – @HPAuk. It provides updates on infectious diseases and other related hazards, including travel advice. Alternatively, you can access their website at www.hpa.org.uk and search for travel advice on cryptosporidiosis.

Another useful source of information is Travel Health (www.travelhealth.co.uk), which has common sense information on dealing with diarrhoea, including what kind of medication to take. It also has an online shop that offers products that purify water and kill the cryptosporidium bacteria – possibly a worthwhile investment if you are travelling to an area where the quality of the water could be suspect.

With these online solutions to hand, you’ll be prepared for any outbreak that occurs within your family when on holiday and help them to feel better more quickly.

Contracting cryptosporidium on holiday is more likely than you think. It is the most common holiday illness around and can be caught from swimming pools and food.

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